“Forget the Wrong” ( Proverbs 17:9 WYC ) by Carley Evans


He that covereth trespass, seeketh friendships; he that rehearseth by an high word (but he who remembereth a wrong), separateth them that (should) be knit together in peace. 

Convicting verse, for sure. How do you point out wrongdoing so that it is not repeated without remembering the wrong? Or are you called to deal with the wrong directly with that individual and then cover it so that others will not know and hold that against that person? And perhaps you are asked to not hold a grudge and seek damage of the one who damaged you? 

When Christians speak of avoiding sin, this verse — to me — reveals the sin that requires diligent avoidance! Some call this a little sin named “gossip.” God calls it hatred and a twisted desire for conflict between others.

“If We Love” ( 1 John 4:11-12 GNV ) by Carley Evans


You hear Christians speak of a God who refuses to live in one who is not holy, i.e. in one who is un-holy. And, most often, this required holiness is defined in negatives. Holiness is a set of rules, a lengthy list of ‘thou shall nots.’

But, Jesus defines holiness as ‘love.’ If you love God and others as you love yourself and as you are loved by God, then God will dwell within you. Not only that, but God’s love is perfect in you. If God’s love is in me, then it is perfect in us.

Beloved, if God so loved us, we ought also to love one another. No man hath seen God at any time. If we love one another, God dwelleth in us, and his love is perfect in us.

What is perfect love?

English:

“Persuaded” ( Romans 8:38-39 GNV ) by Carley Evans


No creature, no power, nothing now or later is able or will be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord, says Paul. He writes of his persuasion to the church at Rome with metaphorical capitol letters ‘FEAR NOT’ on their hearts, saying: 

For I am persuaded that neither death, nor life, nor Angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, Nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord. 

You and I may fall off the highest peak or sink into the depths of the darkest ocean and not be lost from the Lord God, whose love is perfect through Jesus Christ – having become simultaneously human and divine.

As Paul is convinced, I also am persuaded that no thing separates me from the God who loves me.

 

“How Shall He Not?” ( Romans 8: 31-35, 37 GNV ) by Carley Evans


To the church at Rome, Paul reiterates his belief that nothing separates us – the Christian – from the love of God shown in His gift of Jesus Christ to the world. Paul writes:

31 [a]What shall we then say to these things? If God be on our side, who can beagainst us?

32 Who spared not his own Son, but gave him for us all to death, how shall he not with him [b]give us all things also?

33 [c]Who shall lay anything to the charge of God’s chosen? it is[d]God that justifieth.

34 Who shall condemn? it is Christ which is dead: yea, or rather, which is risen again, who is also at the right hand of God, and maketh request also for us.

35 Who shall separate us from the love of [e]Christ? shall tribulation or anguish, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword?

37 [a]Nevertheless, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him that loved us.

These words are quite amazing. Paul says nothing – that is no thing – is able to separate us from the love of Jesus Christ. God’s love is so big, so powerful that it overcomes all obstacles. No one can condemn us. No one can charge us with anything. No one can pull us out of His hand.

Why? Because God gives us His only Son. As Paul says, if God does not spare His own Son in order to save us, why would He allow us to be lost once we are found? God is not illogical.

“Heard From the Beginning” ( 1 John 3:11 GNV ) by Carley Evans


When you’ve known some important truth from the very beginning of a movement, you’ve essentially no excuse for not understanding it. John writes that from the beginning, we’ve heard that we ought to love one another.

“For this is the message that ye heard from the beginning, that we should love one another.”

We therefore have no reason, no justification for backbiting, backstabbing, name-calling, undermining, belittling one another. We’ve no excuse for accusations against one another especially the excuse some call “tough love.” Tough love often looks like hatred. I’ve seen it mock, name-call, belittle, dismiss, accuse, and harm too many over the years and I deny its value in “building up the church.”

Paul calls us to build, not to destroy. We are to enhance one another’s walk with Christ, not demean those walks.

We’ve heard this from the beginning. Let’s act on what we know before others turn and devour us.

“Something New” ( John 13:34-35 GNV ) by Carley Evans


Jesus starts out by telling His disciples ( and us ) that He gives them ( and us ) something new; He gives them ( yes, and us ) a new commandment. Odd, I thought God never changes. At any rate, Jesus Himself says that this commandment is new. 

“A new commandment give I unto you…”

Unlike the old way, we are not to take an eye for an eye or a tooth for a tooth. We are not to retaliate. Rather we are to forgive and yes – forget by loving one another. This other-worldly, beyond-human love is what distinguishes us from the rest of the fallen world. Listen to Jesus tell His disciples ( and us ) the new commandment is:

that ye love one another: as I have loved you, that ye also love one another. By this shall all men know, that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another. 


Selah (selāh - a contemplative pause)

The Season of Lent
Creating Space to Experience God

Lent (an old English word for Spring) is the season we approach the crucifixion (Good Friday) and resurrection (Easter) of Jesus Christ. The season of Lent begins on Ash Wednesday (Feb 13, 2013) and lasts 40 days (excluding Sundays). These 40 days represent the time Jesus spent fasting and praying in the wilderness as he prepared for his public ministry. The gospel accounts tell us that when Jesus was baptized, the Spirit descended on him like a dove and God the Father declared from heaven, “This is my Son, chosen and marked by my love, delight of my life” (Mat 3:17). It was with these words still fresh on his mind that Jesus entered into the solitude of the distraction-free wilderness to meditate and create the space for these truths to sink deep into his heart. In this same way, we…

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“A Tinkling Cymbal” ( 1 Corinthians 13:1-3 GNV ) by Carley Evans


Hi-hat cymbals

Love is the greater gift, greater and of considerably more value than speaking in tongues or faith that moves mountains or prophecy that warns of disaster or knowledge that reveals “all secrets and all knowledge.” Without love, Paul claims we are the same as “sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal.” Our actions, though they be good deeds – even deeds of the martyr, are of no profit to us if we have no love. He warns:

Though I speak with the tongues of men and Angels, and have not love, I am as sounding brass, or a tinkling cymbal. And though I had the gift of prophecy, and knew all secrets and all knowledge, yea, if I had all faith, so that I could remove mountains, and had not love, I were nothing. And though I feed the poor with all my goods, and though I give my body, that I be burned, and have not love, it profiteth me nothing.

I can’t help but think many of us walk about tinkling and sounding as we perform our ‘good deeds’. I include myself in this group – for love does not come naturally to me. I know this is true because I find myself angry at people more than I should be if I love them. Most of my anger against people springs from my heart when I am in my vehicle, and is directed at total strangers.

I can almost hear the tinkling cymbal as it pings down the road. If only I had love, I’d be somebody.


obsecrations

Is there a difference between conviction and guilt?

I heard that guilt is a good thing. But, I maintain that guilt is never a good thing. Instead, conviction is the good thing that leads us to change our behavior – either via apology and often through restitution. On the other hand, guilt leads to self-loathing and inaction. Guilt comes through demonic forces aligned against the Christian. The demon whispers, “Look what you’ve done! You worthless creature. How can anyone love you? Why would God forgive that?!”

Conviction comes from God, the Holy Spirit. He whispers also. But His whisper is gentle, a reminder that your guilt is taken care already through the shed blood of Jesus Christ but that apology and restitution are your tasks. God says, “Go and tell your neighbor you are sorry, and if you took from him, give it back and give something more for good…

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“Mercy in the Morning” ( Psalm 59:16 GNV ) by Carley Evans


God is a refuge in the day of trouble – of this there is no doubt.

His mercy comes in the morning. Ever notice? You go to sleep at night, perhaps with a weight on your chest and in the morning you may be briefly aware of peace, of an absence of worry and heaviness. God’s mercy rests on you instead. He’s given you a night of deep rest, of dreams you may or may not remember. He’s clothed you in His mercy, and for a moment, you may notice. Then you’re up, taking a shower, dressing in something presentable or classy or flashy to go out and about. The weight on your chest returns, sometimes with vengeance, sometimes with subtlety. But God’s mercy seems to drift off and you have no way of getting it back.

Sing to the Lord a new song, a song of praise, of song of recognition that He is merciful and full of grace. He is your stronghold, your mighty fortress, your rock and your redeemer. You live and breathe and walk about in His mercy. Without Him, you are nothing. Even Paul says that the Christian is to be pitied above all if our merciful God does not exist.

Sing to the Lord a new song.

But I will sing of thy power, and will praise thy mercy in the morning: for thou hast been my defense and refuge in the day of my trouble.