“Where Is Job?” ( Job 1: 8, NIV ) by Carley Evans


Where does it say that God knows the location of His servant, Job? In the Book of Job, the angels come “to present themselves before the Lord.” (Job 1:6) Satan is present with these angels. God says to Satan, “Have you considered My servant Job? There is no one on earth like him; he is blameless and upright, a man who fears God and shuns evil.” (Job 1:8)

God’s question implies that He knows where Job is located and what he is doing.

Jesus confirms, “There is nothing concealed that will not be disclosed, or hidden that will not be made known.” (Matthew 10:26) We are not capable of hiding from God. Remember, “even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. So don’t be afraid.” (Matthew 10:30)

“In Those Days” (Mark 13: 19, ESV) by Carley Evans


Usually I do not write about “end times,” as I tend to think what is happening right now is so much more important than what is going to happen at the end of the world. Yet, this is not to imply by any means that what is going to happen in the end is not important!

Jesus speaks of “those days” often.

He says, “But in those days, after that tribulation, the sun will be darkened, and the moon will not give its light, and the stars will be falling from heaven, and the powers in the heavens will be shaken.” (Mark 13: 24 – 25)

First, says Jesus, comes tribulation – terrible and final. “For in those days there will be such tribulation as has not been from the beginning of the creation that God created until now, and never will be.” (Mark 13: 19) False prophets and men who claim to be God appear, and deceive many. Nations rise up against each other as do brothers and sisters, parents and children.

In more ways than one, the world is dark when Jesus comes again. He prays that this time will not be in winter. He acknowledges that God, in His mercy, will cut short the tribulation “for the sake of the elect, whom He chose.” (Mark 13: 20)

When Jesus comes, angels will go out into heaven and into the world to “gather His elect.” (Mark 13: 27)

“Be on guard, keep awake. For you do not know when the time will come.” (Mark 13: 33)

“The Good News” (Luke 2: 8 – 11, ESV) by Carley Evans


Shepherds live out in the fields with their sheep. They stand watch over each and every one of them. The night is long, dark. Perhaps they take turns sleeping.

Angels appear, announcing the birth of a Savior in the city of David — David, who is also a shepherd, one of some note.

The angels come to humble men in the midst of their occupation. (Jesus does this often. He finds Peter the fisherman in the midst of fishing, Matthew the tax collector in the midst of collecting taxes. He interrupts lives, saying ‘Come, follow Me.’)

The angels interrupt the shepherds, announcing that a Savior is born to them. The Savior is come to save them.

This is Jesus’ message. He tells us He has come to save us from ourselves, from our sins, from our separation from God, from death itself. This is the good news.

“No Room” (Luke 2: 6 -7, ESV) by Carley Evans


Jesus is born in a manger because there is no room in the inn. I imagine Joseph and Mary outside, looking for a place to stay, a place for Mary to have her child. The inns are full because of Caesar Augustus’ call for a world census. People are on the move.

An innkeeper is kind enough to offer his manger to the couple. A humble beginning for sure.

I imagine other innkeepers turning Joseph away, not having a place. These individual business owners do not see the potential in this young couple; they do not notice the star glowing in the night sky; they do not feel in their hearts the call of God. They do not hear the angels singing in the distance.

Let us be certain that we open our hearts this week to the coming of our Lord. Let us recognize the star over Bethlehem that calls us to worship the Christ child. Let us rejoice in Jesus, our Savior.

“Discern By Testing” (Romans 12: 2, ESV) by Carley Evans


“Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.”

Two angels come to Sodom where they find Lot sitting at the city gate. Lot invites the angels to come to his house where he feeds them “a feast and bakes unleavened bread, and they eat.” (Genesis 19: 3) Before the angels sleep, the entire city — “all the people to the last man surround the house.” (Genesis 19: 4) The entire city desires to engage in some sort of sexual activity with these two angels. Lot is mortified, and even offers his virginal daughters to the city. The city revolts, seeking to enter Lot’s house to take the angels by force. The two angels strike the men, “both small and great” who are at the door with blindness. (Genesis 19: 11)

Then the angels ask Lot to gather together “anyone you have in the city; bring them out of this place. For we are about to destroy this place, because the outcry against its people has become great before the Lord, and the Lord has sent us to destroy it.” (Genesis 19: 12 – 13)

Lot attempts to persuade his future sons-in-law to join him in his exodus from Sodom, but they think he is joking.

By dawn, the angels urge Lot to take his wife and his two daughters and leave. Lot does not obey. Instead, “he lingers. So the [angels] seize him and his wife and his two daughters by the hand, the Lord being merciful to him, and they bring him out and set him outside the city. And as they bring them out, one says, ‘Escape for your life. Do not look back or stop anywhere in the valley. Escape to the hills, lest you be swept away.” (Genesis 19: 16 – 17)

God asks us not to conform to the world. Lot is not conformed to Sodom. God asks Lot and us to escape, to take as many out of Sodom as we are able, not to bargain with those who are so wicked so as to destroy us along with themselves, not to laugh as did Lot’s sons-in-law, not to linger as did Lot, not to look back as did Lot’s wife.

God commands us to discern by testing what is good and acceptable and perfect in each and every situation.