“My Portion is God” ( Psalm 73:25-26 WYC ) by Carley Evans


For why what is to me in heaven; and what would I of thee on earth? (For what is there for me in heaven, but thee? and what else do I desire here on earth, but thee?) My flesh and mine heart failed; God of mine heart, and my part is God [into] without end. (Though my flesh and my heart fail; but God is my strength, and my portion forever.)

David could be the weary and suffering Job in this passage. Here David speaks perhaps after the shame of murdering Uriah so as to have Bathsheba; perhaps after the death of his son. At any rate, David sings that even if his flesh and heart fail, God is his strength and his portion forever. David rhetorically asks, What else in heaven and earth do I desire? And his answer is, Nothing but You, God.

This truth is what Job discovers in his ordeal. At the end of his rope, so to speak, Job realizes that only God matters, that everything else is a pale shadow compared to Him. Job’s devotion to God does not, however, diminish his love of others or his view of himself. Rather, as Job falls in humility before God, God lifts him up and places him above where he was in the first place.

What do we desire?

“A Consuming Fire” (Hebrews 10: 26, HCSB) by Carley Evans


“It is a terrifying thing to fall into the hands of the living God!” (Hebrews 10: 31)

God disciplines His children, not so as to destroy them but so as to sanctify them. True, vengeance does belong to the Lord; and He does indeed repay. His vengeance falls on His Son with full payment withdrawn on the Cross of Calvary. The stripes across Christ’s back are God’s vengeance against the sins of His children. There is no other sacrifice needed.

God promises, “I never again remember their sins and their lawless acts.” (Hebrews 10: 17)

“Let us hold on to grace. By it, we may serve God acceptably, with reverence and awe, for our God is a consuming fire.” (Hebrews 12: 28 – 29)

The great King David commits adultery with Bathsheba, daughter of Elam and wife of Uriah the Hittite. She becomes pregnant. When King David is made aware, he arranges the death of Bathsheba’s husband, writing to Jacob: “Put Uriah at the front of the fiercest fighting, then withdraw from him so that he is struck down and dies.” (2 Samuel 11: 15)

Bathsheba mourns her husband, but is taken into David’s house once “the time of mourning ends.” She bears a son to David. “However, the Lord considers what David has done to be evil.” (2 Samuel 11: 27)

God uses Nathan to prick David’s conscience. Because of Nathan’s words, David repents. However, Nathan informs David of the consequence of this repentance and of this sin — “The Lord has taken away your sin; you will not die. However, because you treated the Lord with such contempt in this matter, the son born to you will die.” (2 Samuel 12: 13 – 14)

David pleads with God, “fasts, goes home, and spend the night lying on the ground.” He does not eat for seven days. But, the baby dies after a week.

David gets off the ground, washes and anoints himself, changes his clothing and goes to worship the Lord. After, he goes home and eats. David accepts the Lord’s judgment. He continues to serve his God.

“Our God is a consuming fire;” and “it is a terrifying thing to fall into the hands of the living God.”

“Our Only Prayer” (Psalm 51: 12, ESV) by Carley Evans


David sings a request to God. He asks God, “Restore to me the joy of Your salvation.” When does David misplace this joy? David has committed adultery with Bathsheba, and he is keenly aware of his transgressions, saying, “And my sin is ever before me.” (Psalm 51: 3) David is weighed down with wrongdoing. “Against You, You only, have I sinned and done what is evil in Your sight.” (Psalm 51: 4)

If only we felt this as keenly as David. If our sins against others became sins against God, and God only; then we might turn from them quickly and back to Him even faster.

David says, “Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, and in sin did my mother conceive me.” (Psalm 51: 5)
David finds no escape from sin. He knows that God is “justified in [His] words and blameless in [His] judgment.” (Psalm 51: 4)

The only answer for David is to ask God: “Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean; wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow.” (Psalm 51: 7)

He begs, “Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a right spirit within me.” (Psalm 51: 10)

How is it that we think we are different from David? What makes us believe that we are capable of creating clean hearts of our filthy ones or that we are able to renew our distorted spirits under our own power?

God requires of us “a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart, [He] will not despise.” (Psalm 51: 17)
Notice that David asks God, “Uphold me with a willing spirit.” Even our willingness comes from God’s hand. (Psalm 51: 12)

Finally, our only prayer is: “Have mercy on me, O God, according to Your steadfast love; according to Your abundant mercy blot out my transgressions.” (Psalm 51: 1)