“God Is With Us At Our Head” ( 2 Chronicles 13: 12, ESV ) by Carley Evans


Abijah of Judah tells Jeroboam of Israel, “Do not fight against the Lord, the God of your fathers, for you cannot succeed.” (2 Chronicles 13:12) He says to Israel, “As for [Judah], the Lord is our God, and we have not forsaken Him.” (2 Chronicles 13:10) “We keep the charge of the Lord our God, but you have forsaken Him.” (2 Chronicles 13:11) Jeroboam ambushes Abijah so that “the battle is in front of and behind [Israel].” (2 Chronicles 13:14)  With a shout – a battle cry – the men of Judah call upon the Lord who “defeats Jeroboam and all Israel before Abijah and Judah.” (2 Chronicles 13:15)

Abijah says to Jeroboam before the battle, “God is with us at our head.”

Paul says to us, “[Christ] is the head of the body, the church. He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in everything He might be preeminent.” (Colossians 1:18)

“O Lord, there is none like You to help, between the mighty and the weak. Help us, O Lord our God, for we rely on You, and in Your Name we come against this multitude. O Lord, You are our God; let not man prevail against You.” (2 Chronicles 14:11)

“And Not A Few” ( 2 Kings 4: 3, ESV ) by Carley Evans


A widow of one of the sons of the prophets calls out to Elisha, telling him “that the creditor has come to take [her] two children to be slaves” since she is unable to pay her debts. (2 Kings 4:1) Elisha seems to rhetorically ask, “What shall I do for you?” then comes up with an answer immediately. He asks the widow what she has in her house. She says, “Your servant has nothing in the house except a jar of oil.” (2 Kings 4:2)

She has nothing. Yet, she has something.

Elisha tells her to go to her neighbors and “borrow vessels, empty vessels and not too few.” She complies. Elisha tells her to also go inside, shut her door “behind [herself] and [her] sons and pour into all these vessels” the oil from the one jar she still has in her house. She continues pouring oil from the jar, filling each vessel until her sons have no more vessels to bring to her. At this point, the oil from the jar stops flowing.

The only limit to the flow of oil is how many empty vessels she has borrowed. Hence, Elisha’s advice: Borrow “not too few.” She has nothing. Yet, she has something. Now she has more than enough. Yet, there is potential for even more.

The widow tells Elisha that she has no more vessels to fill, that the oil has stopped flowing. He tells her to sell the oil and pay her debts, “and you and your sons can live on the rest.” (2 Kings 4:7)

She has nothing. Yet, she has something. Then she has more than enough. Now, she has everything she needs, both for herself and her sons.

Suppose she gave any oil to her neighbors when she returned their once-empty vessels?