“God Loves Doom?” ( Psalm 33:4-5 WYC ) by Carley Evans


In one of his many songs, David proclaims – at least in the Wycliffe translation of the Word – that God “loveth mercy and doom.” In parenthesis, the translator adds an alternative version: “[God] loveth righteousness and justice.”

On one hand, “mercy”; on the other “righteousness.” On one hand, “doom”; on the other hand “justice.” Even in the final phrase, on one hand, “mercy”; on the other “love.”

For the word of the Lord is rightful (For the word of the Lord is true); and all his works be (done) in faithfulness. He loveth mercy and doom; the earth is full of the mercy of the Lord. (He loveth righteousness and justice; the earth is full of the love of the Lord.)

Imagine God loving “doom.”

If you look around at the state of the world at large, God loving doom is not hard to imagine. Listen to the evening news and doom is all around you – earthquakes, erupting volcanos, tsunamis, rising sea levels, erratic weather patterns, droughts, fires. And this doom does not yet include what people do to you ( or what you do to people… )!

So, where’s the evidence that God loves mercy?

The evidence for God’s mercy is less compelling, you might say. But, I would argue the evidence of God’s mercy is the doom inflicted and endured by Him on the Cross. “All [God’s] works be done in faithfulness.”

 

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“The Man is Merry” ( Psalm 112:5, WYC ) by Carley Evans


David, the psalmist, simply says that if you are merciful to others, if you lend yourself to others fairly and with good judgement, then you are merry. Accompanying your kind words and loving deeds is a happy heart.

The man is merry, that doeth mercy, and lendeth; he disposeth his words in doom; (Happy is the person who giveth favour when he lendeth; he disposeth his deeds with justice, or with good judgement😉

“His Truth” ( Psalm 95: 10-13, DRA ) by Carley Evans


10 Say ye among the Gentiles, the Lord hath reigned. For he hath corrected the world, which shall not be moved: he will judge the people with justice.

11 Let the heavens rejoice, and let the earth be glad, let the sea be moved, and the fulness thereof:

12 the fields and all things that are in them shall be joyful. Then shall all the trees of the woods rejoice

13 before the face of the Lord, because he cometh: because he cometh to judge the earth. He shall judge the world with justice, and the people with his truth.

An appropriate view of God is to recognize Him as Parent. Jesus is smart to introduce God, His Father as our Father when He prays, “Our Father who art in heaven, Hallowed be Thy Name.” David calls God “King” and “Judge.” And yes, God is our King and our Judge. But above these roles, He is our Parent. He corrects us like the perfect parent corrects – with justice and love.

And so, the heavens rejoice; and the earth is glad. Everything on the earth is joyful “because He comes; because He comes to judge the earth…with justice, and the people with HIS TRUTH.”

 

“Fierce In Wrath” ( Nahum 1: 2, HCSB ) by Carley Evans


God is an avenging and jealous Lord; taking vengeance — “fierce in wrath.” Though He “is slow to anger;” He is “great in power” and “never leaves the guilty unpunished.” (Nahum 1:3)

The Lord proclaims, “I kill them with the Words of My mouth. My judgment strikes like lightning. For I desire loyalty and not sacrifice, the knowledge of God rather than burnt offerings. But they, like Adam, violate My covenant; there they betray Me.” (Hosea 6:5-7)

“I depart,” says God, “and return to My place until they recognize their guilt and seek My face; they search for Me in their distress.” (Hosea 5:15)

The Lord says, “Seek Me and live!” (Amos 5:4) “Seek good and not evil so that you may live, and the Lord, the God of Hosts, will be with you, as you claim. Hate evil and love good; establish justice.” (Amos 5:14-15)

Then, we repent. “Come,” we say to each other, “let us return to the Lord. For He tears us, and He heals us; He wounds us, and He binds up our wounds. He revives us after two days, and on the third day He raises us up so we live in His presence. Let us strive to know the Lord. His appearance is sure as the dawn. He comes to us like the rain, like the spring showers that water the land.” (Hosea 6:1-3)

His Name is Jesus, and He is “the One who comforts.” (Isaiah 51:12) He is the One who “is pierced because of our transgressions, crushed because of our iniquities, punishment for our peace was on Him, and we are healed by His wounds.” (Isaiah 53:5)

By His sacrifice, God’s fierce wrath is satisfied.

“Shall I Offer My Firstborn” ( Micah 6: 7, NIV ) by Carley Evans


“What does the Lord require?” (Micah 6:8) Does He require “the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul?” (Micah 6:7) Does He desire the sacrifice of “my firstborn for my transgressions?” (Micah 6:7) Does He demand sacrifice of me? Or, does He ask me “to act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with [my] God.” (Micah 6:8)

He cries out to me that He requires me “to fear [His] Name [which] is wisdom –[and He says,] ‘Heed the rod and the One who appoints it.'” (Micah 6:9)

“Though I sit in darkness, the Lord is my light. Because I sin against Him, I bear the Lord’s wrath, until He pleads my case and establishes my right. He brings me out into the light; I see His righteousness. Then my enemy sees it and is covered with shame, she who says to me, ‘Where is the Lord your God?’ My eyes see her downfall; even now she is trampled underfoot like mire in the streets.” (Micah 7:8-10)

She tells me continuously I must do this but not that, go here but not there, be this but not that — but, God says to me: “The day for building your walls is here.” (Micah 7:11)

“Who is a God like You, who pardons sin and forgives the transgression of the remnant of His inheritance? You do not stay angry forever but delight to show mercy. You again have compassion on [me]; You tread [my] sins underfoot and hurl [my] iniquities into the depths of the sea.” (Micah 7:18-19)

Therefore, I “remember [my] journey” and I “know the righteous acts of the Lord.” (Micah 6:5)

“Falling Into The Hands Of God” ( Hebrews 10: 30 – 31, NEB ) by Carley Evans


“For we know who it is that says, ‘Justice is mine: I repay’; and again, ‘The Lord judges His people.’ It is a terrible thing to fall into the hands of the living God.”

The author of Hebrews calls us to enter God’s rest, writing, “See that you do not refuse the voice that speaks. Those who refuse to hear the oracle speaking on earth find no escape; still less do we escape if we refuse to hear the One who speaks from heaven.” (Hebrews 12: 25 – 26)

Open your ears; listen. Soften your heart; believe. Steel your nerves; walk aright. “Think of Him (Jesus) who submits to such opposition from sinners; that helps you not to lose heart and grow faint. In your struggle against sin, you have not yet resisted to the point of shedding your blood.” (Hebrews 12: 3 – 5)

Admit this to yourself — you struggle against sin. We all struggle at times to cease from our work so that we may enter God’s rest, His Sabbath rest. Jesus gives us help both as an example and via the Holy Spirit who lives within us.

No one should think that God’s discipline is not “terrible.” Via discipline, He molds us like clay into what He desires; after all, He is our Creator. He is God; who are we to question Him? Paul rhetorically asks: “Is God to be charged with injustice? By no means. For He says to Moses, ‘Where I show mercy, I show mercy, and where I pity, I pity.’ Thus it does not depend on man’s will or effort, but on God’s mercy. For Scripture says to Pharaoh, ‘I raise you up for this very purpose, to exhibit My power in My dealings with you, and to spread My fame all over the world.’ Thus He not only shows mercy as He chooses, but also makes men stubborn as He chooses.” (Romans 9: 14 – 18)

“You say, ‘Then why does God blame a man? For who can resist His will?’ Who are you, sir, to answer God back? Can the pot speak to the potter and say, ‘Why did you make me like this?’ Surely the potter can do what he likes with the clay.” (Romans 9: 19 – 21)

Therefore, be grateful that God chooses you. Do not be arrogant, but be humble — knowing that it is truly by God’s grace that you stand in His company, that you find His Sabbath rest.

‘Sing To The Lord A New Song’ (Psalm 33: 4 – 5, ESV) by Carley Evans


“Shout for joy in the Lord!” (Psalm 33: 1) Our joy is in the Lord. His Word “is upright, and all His work is done in faithfulness.” How can we not be joyful, knowing that our God works in faithfulness and righteousness? God “loves justice.” And, “the earth is full of [His] steadfast love.”

“Therefore the Lord wants to be gracious to you, and therefore He exalts Himself to show mercy to you. For the Lord is a God of justice; blessed are [we] who wait for Him.” (Isaiah 30: 18) God’s mercy to us emerges directly from His sense of justice! He promises, “You shall weep no more.” God promises that “at the sound of your cry — as soon as He hears it, He answers you.” (Isaiah 30: 19)

Therefore, rejoice! “Sing to [God] a new song!” (Psalm 33: 3) Leave your sad dirge behind. Remember, as David does: “You [O Lord] are a hiding place for me; You preserve me from trouble; You surround me with shouts of deliverance.” (Psalm 32: 7)

We are blessed for our “transgression is forgiven, [our] sin is covered.” God “counts no iniquity” against us. (Psalm 32: 1)

Therefore, rejoice! “Sing to [God] a new song!”