“For The Rest Of The World” (Luke 2: 28 – 32, NIV) by Carley Evans


For any of us who might in the secret depths of our hearts think that Caucasians are somehow better than the rest of the world’s populations; let us recall that Jesus is the “glory of Israel.” Jesus is an Israelite, a Jew. He is not a blonde, blue-eyed, well tanned white man. He does not look like me; rather He looks like people who live in the Middle East. He may in fact look like some of our present day enemies.

I notice many images of Jesus created do not look remotely like my present day enemies. Here I am referring to those cowardly zealots of Islam who destroyed the World Trade Center and many lives in 2001.

When I look at pretty images of Jesus, I make a concerted effort to alter them in my mind’s eye for Isaiah tells us that nothing about Jesus was particularly attractive. I also remember Jesus is a Jew.

Simeon, as he holds the eight day old infant Jesus, proclaims Him to be the “glory of Israel;” but he also steps out of his comfort zone and declares Jesus will be a “revelation for the gentiles.” Simeon is a man like any other of his time; he does not associate with gentiles. But he recognizes that this child is the Christ, the Messiah who is come for Israel first, and then for the rest of the world.

“The Signs Of The Virgin Birth And of Jonah” (Isaiah 7: 14, ESV) by Carley Evans


God tells Ahaz to ask for a sign. But Ahaz responds, “I will not ask, and I will not put the Lord to the test.”

So, Isaiah tells Ahaz and us that God will give a sign. “Therefore the Lord Himself will give you a sign. Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel. He shall eat curds and honey when He knows how to refuse the evil and choose the good.” (Isaiah 7: 14 – 15)

The Son of God comes as “a great light.” (Isaiah 9: 2) He comes as “Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.” (Isaiah 9: 6)

When Mary and Joseph present their son as holy to the Lord on the eighth day of his life — offering a pair of turtledoves — Simeon, a “righteous and devout” man who is “waiting for the consolation of Israel,” sees Jesus. When Simeon sees the Christ child, he takes Him in his arms, saying: “Lord, now You are letting Your servant depart in peace, according to Your Word; for my eyes have seen Your salvation that You have prepared in the presence of all peoples, a light for revelation for the Gentiles, and for glory to Your people Israel.” (Luke 2: 25, 29 – 32)

Simeon lays eyes on the sign which God promises to Ahaz, and which Ahaz does not request.

Simeon tells Mary, “Behold, this child is appointed for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and for a sign that is opposed, so that the thoughts from many hearts may be revealed.” (Luke 2: 34, 35)

Jesus is a sign that is opposed.

Jesus Himself warns, “An evil and adulterous generation seeks for a sign, but no sign will be given to it except the sign of Jonah.” (Matthew 16: 4)

The two signs God gives us are the virgin birth of Jesus and the resurrection of Christ.