“Confirmed in the Belief” ( Colossians 2: 6 – 9, KNOX ) by Carley Evans


Paul worries about the Colossians – they do not know him personally. He is with them in spirit, but not face to face. He is concerned they are deceived by high-sounding, religious jabber that may call them away from our Head, that is, Jesus Christ who is the full embodiment of “the Godhead.” Paul seeks to encourage them to avoid the principles which appear spiritual on the outside and follow after the One who nailed those principles to a Cross. He writes:

“as ye have taken Jesus Christ our Lord, walk ye in him,

and be ye rooted and builded above in him [rooted and built above in Christ], and confirmed in the belief, as ye have learned, abounding in him in doing of thankings.

See ye that no man deceive you by philosophy and vain fallacy, after the tradition of men, after the elements of the world, and not after Christ.

For in him dwelleth body-like all the fullness of the Godhead.”

Paul calls the Colossians to “abound in Him in doing of thankings” and in so doing, confirm themselves as “in the belief.” They are not to worry over whether they’ve eaten the right thing or celebrated the correct day; rather they are to abound in love, in unity, and in thanksgiving. As Paul writes elsewhere:

“8 The time will come when we shall outgrow prophecy, when speaking with tongues will come to an end, when knowledge will be swept away; we shall never have finished with charity. Our knowledge, our prophecy, are only glimpses of the truth; 10 and these glimpses will be swept away when the time of fulfilment comes. 11 (Just so, when I was a child, I talked like a child, I had the intelligence, the thoughts of a child; since I became a man, I have outgrown childish ways.) 12 At present, we are looking at a confused reflection in a mirror; then, we shall see face to face; now, I have only glimpses of knowledge; then, I shall recognize God as he has recognized me. 13 Meanwhile, faith, hope and charity persist, all three; but the greatest of them all is charity.” (1 Corinthians 13: 8-13, KNOX)

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“Strength Through Weakness” (2 Corinthians 12: 9 – 10, HCSB) by Carley Evans


Paul, of all people, boasts in his weaknesses. He even writes that he “takes pleasure” in them, recognizing that when he is “weak, then [he] is strong.”

How is this possible? In weaknesses, strength is perfected through the grace afforded by Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit, and God the Father — i.e. through the works and persons of the Godhead.

Paul claims that his physical [or perhaps psychological] weakness, his “thorn in the flesh” remains in order that he “not exalt [himself].” (2 Corinthians 12: 7) Within his weaknesses, including “insults, catastrophes, persecutions, and pressures,” Paul finds God’s “grace is sufficient for [him].”

Weakness remains in order that we not exalt ourselves, in order that we do not think more of ourselves than we ought.

Paul prays, “that the perception of your mind may be enlightened so that you may know what is the hope of His calling, what are the glorious riches of His inheritance among the saints, and what is the immeasurable greatness of His power to us who believe, according to the working of His vast strength.” (Ephesians 1: 18 – 19)